Tuesday, August 04, 2020

(weekday Feast) The Transfiguration of the Lord. Year A (Special weekday solemnity ) - Thursday August 6th, 2020

The Transfiguration of the Lord. Year A

(Special weekday solemnity )

THURSDAY 6TH August 2020
Readings for
The Transfiguration of the Lord




FIRST READING: Dan 7:9-10, 13-14 or 2 Pet 1:16-19

Psalm: 96: 1-2, 5-6, 9 "The Lord is King, the most high over all the earth."
GOSPEL ACCLAMATION, (Mt 17:5).Alleluia, alleluia! This is my son, the beloved. In whom is all my delight. Listen to him. Alleluia. .
GOSPEL: Matthew 17:1-9

 

Image: Shutterstock Licensed stock illustration ID: 1206378808. The Holy Transfiguration of our Lord God and Savior Jesus Christ. Illustration - fresco in Byzantine style.By Julia Raketic
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Please listen to my audio recordings of the readings, prayers and reflections for The Transfiguration of the Lord. Year A -  by clicking this link here: https://soundcloud.com/user-633212303/faith-hope-and-love-feast-of-the-transfiguration-year-a/s-q11VV0v7mMg  
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This feast of the Transfiguration, had its origin in the East in the fourth century as the commemoration of the dedication of the church of the Transfiguration on Mount Tabor. It was observed in the West from the eighth century and extended to the entire Western Church in the fifteenth century. The feast celebrates the divine radiance shining in Christ's human flesh and God's glory shining forth in the lives of Christians.
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 Jesus was transfigured on the mountain top and revealed, to these privileged disciples, a truth that would soon become known to countless generations. Jesus in the only begotten son of God.

 

The important thing following this is, "did the disciples become transfigured (or changed) by this revelation……"   It is important that the eventually did. Because this revelation was for them and us…. To encourage us to look deeply into Jesus life and learn from what it tells us about God…….   Jesus life, his words, his actions, his parables, who he ate with, how he treated sinners and outcasts, his way of living, his way of dying…  shows us just what God is like……     and encourages us to learn and take in the values embodied by Jesus life, words and actions……..  to be transfigured, by his example.

 

The old testament has the example of Moses, who after speaking with God came away literally glowing….his face shining……. The encournter with the God of transformation made him glow……..   I think we can all think of people who, because of their love, compassion, and energy, appear to be radiant… glowing…..     filled with grace and light…..  such people are contagious…. Their energy, vitality, radiance also is transforming…..

 

Jesus is the best example of them all….. he glows with the divine light of God…… he did this all the time…. Even when this was not physically visible,,,,,  he shone with God's light in happy times, in times of suffering……….    His life was a transformation, and he invites his followers to walk this difficult path of transformation too….

The feast of the transfiguration is a special one…..   the date also coincides with other world events….…..    Such as today also being, the 75th  anniversary of the first atomic bomb ever exploded over over  a populated region….   Hiroshima…. (Our Prayers are that there be a universal end to weapons of mass destruction and misery….)….  And in this time of suffering and war through the world…. Today is an important  opportunity to pay to God for a peace and understanding and goodwill and respect between all nations and cultures and creeds….   A Peace..that only God can give our hearts and minds….  And tranforming peace…..   peace that brings the light of hope and peace and love into a world struggling with hatred, violence and revenge…..   May God help break the cycle of violence, retribution and counter-retribution that has wrought tragedy over countless generations through history. …

 

I also note that it's the anniversary of the death of Pope Saint Paul VI, who entered eternal life on this feast of the transfiguration, back in 1978.   Reading his biography a few years ago…..   and being struck by Pope Paul's passion and love and his vision for the world, including a vision for peace….. it was Pope Paul who ensured that the Vatican Council begun by Pope John the XIII and so transofmring with the spirit the church to address the needs of today….    It was Pope Paul who kept it going after Pope John's death halfway throuhg the council threartened to derail the work begun……..   they said of Pope Paul,    it may have needed a saintly man like Pope John to laucnh the second vatican counctil. But the spirit seemd to need a man of the vision and clarity of Pope Paul to bring it back to port…….   

 

Each and every Christian vocation…    lay, religious priests….   And especially those who are in and amongst the world working with God's Spirit to transform according to God's vision

 Let us pray that God will tranform our heart and mind and transfigure them according to God's good will…  and shape our hearts and attitudes according to the mind and heart of Christ and his vision for a world made new…. The Light of the Resurrection, the Light of God's glory… and the light of peace, hope and love.

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References:
Fr Paul W. Kelly

Image: Shutterstock Licensed stock illustration ID: 1206378808. The Holy Transfiguration of our Lord God and Savior Jesus Christ. Illustration - fresco in Byzantine style.By Julia Raketic


The Transfiguration of the Lord. Year A

(Special solemnity - weekday) ()

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In the name of the Father, and of the Son, and

of the Holy Spirit.

Amen.

A.              The grace of our Lord Jesus Christ, and the love of God, and the communion of the Holy Spirit be with you all.    And with your spirit.

{{Hi}}

 

Coming together as brothers and sisters in Christ, on this Solemnity of the Transfiguration of the Lord, let us prepare ourselves to celebrate the sacred mysteries by recalling our sins and remembering Christs greater mercy.

Lord Jesus, you are the light of the world. Lord have mercy

You grant that all who follow you, will have the light of life. christ have mercy.

You lead us through the darkness of this world to the radiant glory of your kingdom. Lord have mercy.


May almighty God have mercy on us, forgive us our sins, and bring us to everlasting life. Amen.
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Memorial Acclamation

Save us, Saviour of the world,

for by your Cross and Resurrection,

you have set us free.



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PREFACE: THE MYSTERY OF THE TRANSFIGURATION

Communion side. pwk: RH

(OPENING THEME VARIATION:   verse 2 )
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{{Many thanks for participating in this time of praise and reflection upon our loving God. May God's radiant light shine upon and guide us always.....

·              Go and announce the Gospel of the Lord.

            All:      Thanks be to God.

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Archive of homilies and reflections: http://homilycatholic.blogspot.com.au
To contact Fr. Paul, please email:
paulwkelly68@gmail.com

To listen to my weekly homily audio podcast, please click this link here.
NB - It is often a week or so Ahead:
https://soundcloud.com/user-633212303/tracks

You are welcome to subscribe to Fr Paul's homily mail-out by sending an email to this address:
paulkellyreflections+subscribe@googlegroups.com

Further information relating to the audio productions linked to this Blog:
"Faith, Hope and Love - Christian worship and reflection" - Led by Rev Paul Kelly

Prayers and chants — Roman Missal, 3rd edition, © 2010, The International Commission on English in the liturgy. (ICEL)

Scriptures - New Revised Standard Version: © 1989, and 2009 by the NCC-USA. (National Council of Churches of Christ - USA)

"The Psalms" ©1963, 2009, The Grail - Collins publishers. 

Prayers of the Faithful - " Together we pray," by Robert Borg'. E.J. Dwyer, Publishers, (1993) . (Sydney Australia).

Sung "Mass In Honour of St. Ralph Sherwin" - By Jeffrey M. Ostrowski. The ….Gloria, Copyright © 2011 ccwatershed.org.

- "Faith, Hope and Love" theme hymn - in memory of William John Kelly - Inspired by 1 Corinthians 13:1-13. Music by Paul W. Kelly. Arranged and sung, with additional lyrics by Stefan Kelk. 2019.

 

"Quiet Time."  Instrumental Reflection music. Written by Paul W Kelly. 1988, 2007. & This arrangement Stefan Kelk 2020.

- "Today I Arise" - For Tricia J Kelly. Original words and music by Paul W. Kelly. Inspired by St Patrick's Prayer. Arranged and sung, with additional lyrics by Stefan Kelk. 2019. 

KER 2020


May God bless and keep you.
 
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Friday, July 31, 2020

Eighteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time. Year A - Sunday, August 2, 2020. EPISODE 243

Eighteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time. Year A - Sunday, August 2, 2020

EPISODE 243


Readings for 18th Sunday in Ordinary Time - A

FIRST READING: Isaiah 55:1-3

Psalm 145:8-9, 15-16, 17-18. "The Lord is king, the most high over all the earth."
SECOND READING:
Romans 8:35, 37-39

GOSPEL ACCLAMATION, (Matthew 4:4b).Alleluia, alleluia! No one lives on bread alone. But on every word that comes from the mouth of God.
GOSPEL:
Matthew 14:13-21

 

Image Credit: Shutterstock Licensed image stock photo ID:  ID: 1184313556. Biblical vector illustration series, Jesus feeds the five thousand. By rudall30
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Please listen to my audio recordings of the readings, prayers and reflections for the Eighteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time. Year A - Sunday, August 2, 2020, by clicking this link here: https://soundcloud.com/user-633212303/faith-hope-and-love-ordinary-18a-episode-243  (EPISODE: 243)
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Prologue: "What Christ gives us is quite explicit if his own words are interpreted according to their Aramaic meaning. The expression 'this is my Body' means 'this is myself.' [Jesuit Theologian, KARL RAHNER (1904-1984)].

 

These reading remind us that in every age the Lord ensures that he feeds us with his Body and Blood; He nourishes us with his life-giving and transforming Word; He strengthens us with his grace;  restores us with his mercy and ….(first and foremost!), He loves us as his own, as sons and daughters…….with a bond of love that simply can never be broken.  Not even death, nor life, not distance nor time, nothing at all can separate us from God's love. And then……. this gracious God sends us out as his family……his friends, his people, …….disciples and co-workers, to be an instrument of God's nourishment and strength for others.

 

Jesus is still at work in our lives and in the world; inspiring people of goodwill everywhere to respond with compassion and practical action to help the starving, the homeless, the guilty, the dispossessed, the ill.. and so many others in need.

Let us always remember Jesus advice... "YOU give them something to eat, yourselves!"

 

(REFERENCES: Break Open the Word).

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18 Sunday Year A

 

This intriguing event of the distribution of the loaves and fish was primarily intended for those followers of Jesus who were worried about the possibility of persecution from the legal authorities, other religious groups, even friends and family members, and also worried by what seemed to be the very slow progress of Christianity. The story reminds them, as President Roosevelt said when he was inaugurated in 1933, the only thing to fear is fear itself, blind unreasoning terror that paralyses our every action. The impossible will now seem reasonable when we choose to follow and accept this man of God. This is a reassuring story for the early Christian community but also for us today.

 

When we read the Gospels, besides taking in the details of the parable or factual event, we should pay close attention to what the disciples are doing. Are they on the periphery, watching and listening? Are they questioning Jesus? Are they sharing in the action? Most importantly, what are they learning? They represent us today. What they saw and experienced is what we are supposed to absorb. We need to understand their apprehension as well as their wonder, their hesitation as well as their courage. The disciples wanted to send the people away, and make them responsible for their own food. A natural response when the task seemed beyond their comfortable capacity to respond to the problem. They were still an inward-looking group, unable to move outside their own, self-contained little world, even though they were centered on Christ. They were looking to him, as usual, to deal with the tough stuff, and Christ's answer to this was significant and astonishing: Feed them yourselves.

 

They said this was impossible and quite beyond their powers and their means; all they had was five loaves and two fish.

 

So, once again it was up to him to show and teach them. he took the little food they had, made a ritual blessing, and told the disciples to distribute it among the people. The disciples did so, moving among the people and feeding them. All were fed, with much left over. The disciples thus became instrumental in the saving work of Christ; the disciples, the learners, had received a valuable and significant lesson in discipleship, the following of Christ; that the mission of Christ was to all who hear and follow him, not to a select few.

 

Sometimes when we pray for divine intervention, God's answer to us is, "But you, you can do that yourselves." This is what we see in today's gospel where the disciples are so concerned about the hungry crowd that they instruct Jesus to dismiss them so that they could go and buy themselves something to eat. Jesus turns and says to them, "Hey, you give them something to eat. You can take care of that yourselves." Only then do they remember the seemingly insignificant person with five loaves and two fish. Suddenly, to their surprise, there was more than enough to satisfy the enormous hunger of all the people. That is the essence of what we traditionally know as the miracle of the Feeding of the Five Thousand. But it is more significantly, the increase in the awareness of what can be done by the collection of individuals who can make great things happen when they cooperate for the good of all.

 

Teresa of Avila, great Spanish Carmelite mystic and saint of the sixteenth century said: 'We cannot be sure if we are loving God, but we can know quite well if we are loving our neighbour. And be certain that, the farther advanced you find you are in this, the greater the love you will have for God.'

 

This insight from Teresa and the subtext of this gospel event is at the very heart of the hope we have as a Eucharistic community Whenever the Church gathers round the altar at Mass, it hears the word of God, the word of life, and shares in the sacramental body of Christ, All are fed from the same source, there is a communion, all become one in Christ.

 

 Christ established a clear association between word and food; both are life-giving, both are necessary. In this passage we can glimpse, for a brief moment, a church, an assembly gathered around Christ, hearing the word of life, and receiving the food of life. All heard the same word, all received the same food. There was a communion. This was one of the things the apostles and disciples had to learn. The feeding of the 5000 is intimately linked to the institution of the Eucharist. Most telling is the use of the same verbs to describe what Jesus does in the miracle: he takes, blesses, breaks and gives. Just as he will do again at the Last Supper and just as we do in the Eucharist.

 

In the Eucharist we are both the ones who are fed and the ones who must enable Christ's nourishment to reach others. If we can access this food, like the 5000, we will eat our fill, and yet there will be plenty left over. The task for us, like to disciples seems initially impossible, but as the prayer of Saint Oscar Romero encourages us:

 

We lay foundations that will need further development.

We provide yeast that produces far beyond our capabilities.

We cannot do everything, and there is a sense of liberation in realizing that.

This enables us to do something, and to do it very well.

We are workers, not master builders; ministers, not messiahs.

We are prophets of a future not our own.

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References:
Homily:  Fr Peter Dillon

 

Prologue: Fr Paul W. Kelly

Image Credit: Shutterstock Licensed image stock photo ID:  ID: 1184313556. Biblical vector illustration series, Jesus feeds the five thousand. By rudall30


Eighteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time. Year A (Sunday, August 2, 2020) (EPISODE: 243 )
The Lord be with you.
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{{Peace and greetings to you all.}}

 

My friends in Christ, to worthily celebratethe sacred mysteries, let us first acknowledge our sins.
Lord Jesus, you were lifted up to draw all people to yourself: Lord, have mercy//You shouldered the cross, to bear our suffering and sinfulness: Christ, have mercy// You open for your people the way from death into life: Lord, have mercy//
May almighty God have mercy on us, forgive us our sins, and bring us to everlasting life. Amen.
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Memorial Acclamation
2. When we eat this Bread and drink this Cup, we proclaim your Death, O Lord, until you come again.
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PREFACE:  Sunday  I
Euch prayer III
Communion side. pwk: RH

(OPENING THEME VARIATION:  2)
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{{May God's love, strength, mercy and kindness guide you all this week.}}


Go and announce the Gospel of the Lord.

 

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Archive of homilies and reflections: http://homilycatholic.blogspot.com.au
To contact Fr. Paul, please email:
paulwkelly68@gmail.com

To listen to my weekly homily audio podcast, please click this link here.
NB - It is often a week or so Ahead:
https://soundcloud.com/user-633212303/tracks

You are welcome to subscribe to Fr Paul's homily mail-out by sending an email to this address:
paulkellyreflections+subscribe@googlegroups.com

Further information relating to the audio productions linked to this Blog:
"Faith, Hope and Love - Christian worship and reflection" - Led by Rev Paul Kelly

Prayers and chants — Roman Missal, 3rd edition, © 2010, The International Commission on English in the liturgy. (ICEL)

Scriptures - New Revised Standard Version: © 1989, and 2009 by the NCC-USA. (National Council of Churches of Christ - USA)

"The Psalms" ©1963, 2009, The Grail - Collins publishers. 

Prayers of the Faithful - " Together we pray," by Robert Borg'. E.J. Dwyer, Publishers, (1993) . (Sydney Australia).

Sung "Mass In Honour of St. Ralph Sherwin" - By Jeffrey M. Ostrowski. The ….Gloria, Copyright © 2011 ccwatershed.org.

- "Faith, Hope and Love" theme hymn - in memory of William John Kelly - Inspired by 1 Corinthians 13:1-13. Music by Paul W. Kelly. Arranged and sung, with additional lyrics by Stefan Kelk. 2019.

 

"Quiet Time."  Instrumental Reflection music. Written by Paul W Kelly. 1988, 2007. & This arrangement Stefan Kelk 2020.

- "Today I Arise" - For Tricia J Kelly. Original words and music by Paul W. Kelly. Inspired by St Patrick's Prayer. Arranged and sung, with additional lyrics by Stefan Kelk. 2019. 

May God bless and keep you. 
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Thursday, July 23, 2020

Seventeenth Sunday in Ordinary Time. Year A - Sunday, July 26, 2020. EPISODE 242

Seventeenth Sunday in Ordinary Time. Year A - Sunday, July 26, 2020

EPISODE 242


Readings for 17th Sunday in Ordinary Time - A

FIRST READING: 1 Kings 3:5, 7-12

Psalm 119:57+72, 76-77, 127-28, 129-30. "Lord, I love your commands."
SECOND READING:
Romans 8:28-30

GOSPEL ACCLAMATION, (cf. Matthew 11:25).Alleluia, alleluia! Blessed are you, Father, Lord of Heaven and earth. You have revealed to little ones the mysteries of the Kingdom.
GOSPEL:
Matthew 13:44-52 or 13:44-46

 

Image Credit: Shutterstock Licensed stock photo ID: 80573221. Single beam from the sun that shines into the mouth of a cave. By berserg  
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Please listen to my audio recordings of the readings, prayers and reflections for the Seventeenth Sunday in Ordinary Time. Year A - Sunday, July 26, 2020 by clicking this link here: https://soundcloud.com/user-633212303/faith-hope-and-love-ordinary-17a-episode-242  (EPISODE: 242)
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Prologue: In the parable, a man discovers a treasure in a field and sells EVERYTHING else he has, in order that he could HAVE THAT treasure. The Treasure of infinite value is God's Kingdom,..//  Jesus' good news…//  being united forever with Jesus in God's family……/  IT IS LIKE A RARE TREASURE… Nothing else on earth is as valuable as this……  It is worth giving up everything else to attain it…//…  It has a richness and a depth that can never be fully plumbed {As I read that parable of the treasure in the field….…..I am reminded of the quote from G.K. Chesterton, (the great English scholar and writer)…  (and I am paraphrasing it liberally here)….  He writes….. 'It's not that Christianity hasn't worked, it is just that nobody's really tried it yet !' } (actually, the correct quote is: "The Christian ideal has not been tried and found wanting. It has been found difficult; and left untried." ― G.K. Chesterton, In "What's Wrong with the World").    Our faith is a treasure of incredible depth…   if one thinks they have grasped it enough to 'find it wanting'… I am really not sure where they have been digging………..The gospel continues to be priceless and precious; worthy of all our efforts to explore. …  May God, who has so graciously accompanied and given success to our work so often in the past, continue this good work in us and bring it to perfection. 

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17th SUNDAY-ORDINARY TIME-YEAR-A-2020

Aren't you just a little envious of Solomon being invited by God to, "Ask what you would like me to give you". What a tantalising question. Give yourself a moment before you answer, but what would you ask for?

 

Then you might ask yourself, "did Solomon get it right?", when he asked for wisdom when there would have been so many more immediately gratifying things to request. What about heaps of money or excellent health, or if he was less selfish world peace or an end to poverty. The list is endless, or at least my list is.

 

Of course, it's the great riddle of life: why would he ask for something that he already had. Why do we always want more of what we already have, when we don't use all that we have got?

 

In some way, all of us are treasure hunters, looking for the next new thing that will make us completely happy, yet we always seem to be looking for something more. Not unlike a child who is frustrated when they can't grab another biscuit because both hands are already full. We seem to be more fearful of a future that might run out of what we need, rather than relishing a present that is providing all that is necessary.

 

Mind you, Jesus loves the searcher, the seeker, even if we go searching in the wrong places sometimes.  The problem is that we are usually searching for success or riches – the things that will make life easier –rather than the things that will make life more meaningful. In doing this we tend to miss out on the whole purpose of life. How to live best, not easiest.

 

For the Christian, the fine pearl of the parable is our faith, our relationship with God, not that we feel we ever really grasp the full value of this precious thing, but the search for the pearl commits us to seek and discover direction, purpose and answers.

 

When Solomon asked for wisdom, he found out that he could have an easy life, if that he really wanted but it wouldn't teach him the reason for life. Wisdom taught him how to dig for the real treasures of life, not hidden in the ground, but already in his grasp.

 

Once again we discover that Jesus' own perception of life differs sharply from so many people's. He was constantly challenging people to see and see again in order to understand anew. To that purpose, his stories turned much of popular wisdom on its head, and this was done in the hope that his listeners might catch something of another way of living in God's world. In effect, Jesus had what Solomon prayed for – a heart to discern the ways of the people and the ways of God, as well as determination to close the gap between the two ways.

 

We know that Jesus had to give up everything he values – his family, his home, his security – to do his Father's will and preach the kingdom of God. For Jesus there is o treasure greater than his Father's will: when he uncovered what it was, he renounced everything to make it his own.

 

We realistically know that none of us can gain anything of value without renouncing something. Perhaps what we have to renounce first is our perception of what real treasure in life really is. For some this realisation comes early in life, for others, it is a lifelong search. For people of faith the real treasure of life in right under our noses – in the people we share life with, in the opportunities in life we face every day to live the values of Jesus. Yet we all try to look elsewhere for fulfilment, hoping that the treasure will fall into our lap, realising that none of this might appear as a glittering prize, but may be found in the ordinariness and the common-place events of each day, not hidden deeply in the complexities of life. Perhaps it is a clearer vision we should be asking from God. Vision to see what is already ours and to see past what does not bring us fulfilment.

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References:
homily:  fr peter Dillon.

 

Prologue: Fr Paul W. Kelly

Image Credit: Shutterstock Licensed stock photo ID: 80573221. Single beam from the sun that shines into the mouth of a cave. By Berserg 


Seventeenth Sunday in Ordinary Time. Year A (Sunday, July 26, 2020) (EPISODE: 242 )
The grace of our Lord Jesus Christ, and the love of God, and the communion of the Holy Spirit be with you all.
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{{Good wishes to you all.}}

 

Coming together as Gods family, let us call to mind our sins.
Lord Jesus, you call your people to turn away from sin: Lord, have mercy//You teach us wisdom, and write your truth in our inmost heart: Christ, have mercy//You forgive sins through the ministry of reconciliation: Lord, have mercy//
May almighty God have mercy on us, forgive us our sins, and bring us to everlasting life. Amen.
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Memorial Acclamation
1. We proclaim your Death, O Lord, and profess your Resurrection until you come again.
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PREFACE:
Sundays Ordinary VII
Euch prayer II
Communion side. pwk: LH

(OPENING THEME VARIATION:  1)
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{{I pray that you have a wonderful and grace-filled week.}}


Go forth, the Mass is ended.

 

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Archive of homilies and reflections: http://homilycatholic.blogspot.com.au
To contact Fr. Paul, please email:
paulwkelly68@gmail.com

To listen to my weekly homily audio podcast, please click this link here.
NB - It is often a week or so Ahead:
https://soundcloud.com/user-633212303/tracks

You are welcome to subscribe to Fr Paul's homily mail-out by sending an email to this address:
paulkellyreflections+subscribe@googlegroups.com

Further information relating to the audio productions linked to this Blog:
"Faith, Hope and Love - Christian worship and reflection" - Led by Rev Paul Kelly

Prayers and chants — Roman Missal, 3rd edition, © 2010, The International Commission on English in the liturgy. (ICEL)

Scriptures - New Revised Standard Version: © 1989, and 2009 by the NCC-USA. (National Council of Churches of Christ - USA)

"The Psalms" ©1963, 2009, The Grail - Collins publishers. 

Prayers of the Faithful - " Together we pray," by Robert Borg'. E.J. Dwyer, Publishers, (1993) . (Sydney Australia).

Sung "Mass In Honour of St. Ralph Sherwin" - By Jeffrey M. Ostrowski. The ….Gloria, Copyright © 2011 ccwatershed.org.

- "Faith, Hope and Love" theme hymn - in memory of William John Kelly - Inspired by 1 Corinthians 13:1-13. Music by Paul W. Kelly. Arranged and sung, with additional lyrics by Stefan Kelk. 2019.

 

"Quiet Time."  Instrumental Reflection music. Written by Paul W Kelly. 1988, 2007. & This arrangement Stefan Kelk 2020.

- "Today I Arise" - For Tricia J Kelly. Original words and music by Paul W. Kelly. Inspired by St Patrick's Prayer. Arranged and sung, with additional lyrics by Stefan Kelk. 2019. 


May God bless and keep you.
 
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Thursday, July 16, 2020

Sixteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time. Year A - Sunday, July 19, 2020 EPISODE 241

Sixteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time. Year A - Sunday, July 19, 2020
EPISODE 241



Readings for 16th Sunday in Ordinary Time - A
FIRST READING: Wisdom 12:13, 16-19
Psalm 86:5-6, 9-10, 15-16. "Lord, you are good and forgiving."
SECOND READING:
Romans 8:26-27
GOSPEL ACCLAMATION, (cf. Matthew 11:25).Alleluia, alleluia! Blessed are you, Father, Lord of Heaven and earth. You have revealed to little ones the mysteries of the Kingdom.
GOSPEL:
Matthew 13:24-43 or 13:24-30
 
Shutterstock licensed stock photo ID: 1325193074. Field bindweed twines around wheat grain stalks & spikes in a field. Close-up of convolvulus, having pink flower buds & green leaves, trails around a golden wheat stalk. Weed growing in a wheat field. By Ellita
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Please listen to my audio recordings of the readings, prayers and reflections for the Sixteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time. Year A - Sunday, July 19, 2020, by clicking this link here: https://soundcloud.com/user-633212303/faith-hope-and-love-ordinary-16a-episode-241/s-uDg2z4r3R2T  (EPISODE: 241)
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PROLOGUE: Fr Paul Kelly:  A Quality that describes God in the readings this weekend is "Forbearance"  -which is defined as: "patience, being long-suffering, tolerance, or "the act of refraining from enforcing a debt, obligation or right."   (Merriam Webster Dictionary Online)  

"God is all-powerful, but is gentle and always wants to give us time for a change, for transformation, and for repentance." (Abbot's homily, Monastery of Christ in the desert).  

I for one am very glad that God is patient..  ….That God gives us time to be fully transformed by the gospel…….. I am sure we have all benefited from that most reassuring of Divine qualities… "forbearance and mercy."   

 We are invited to focus more than ever on doing as much good as we can, in being people of kindness, mercy, justice and compassion in deeper ways with each passing day. Let us not allow the hurts and sins of the world to stop us from doing yet-more-good; to love more deeply than before. When the weeds around us might otherwise prompt us to respond with negativity, bitterness, revenge or hate, and where sin and hurt abound, let us ensure that the grace, kindness and forbearing love of Christ all the more abound in all that we do and say…    
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16th Sunday Ordinary Time – Year A – 2020
(Our apologies for the error last week where we initially posted this weekend's homily – so if it looks/sounds familiar, it is because it briefly appeared previously. We corrected the error as soon as it was noted. Here it is, related to the correct Gospel and readings. Pk).

We all have a tendency to divide people into two categories: saints or sinners. However, this division is quite unreal. Human beings are complex, and we find things that are at odds with one another coexisting in the same human being.

There is a coexistence in every person of good and evil, strength and weakness, loyalty and betrayal. As soon as we discover a weakness in someone, we write that person off. Our heroes must be perfect. As soon as we find a flaw or crack in another person we lose faith in them.

But we all know ourselves and we know that things are not that simple. We are all an extraordinary mixture of good and bad. Moreover, the roots of good are so intertwined with the roots of evil that one can't be pulled up without pulling up the other. If we aren't careful we may end up having no one who is free from imperfections and we will start to think everyone is untrustworthy and should be treated with suspicion. 


By concentrating on people vices, we become blind to their virtues. We are only too eager to voice our criticisms, but reluctant to offer a single word of encouragement, and in this way, we bar every road to improvement.

The message of this parable is something Jesus lived throughout his ministry.


He reached out to all sorts of people. Mixing with priests and crooks, scribes and politicians, children and tax-collectors. The Pharisees, those whose very name means " the separated ones", criticised him for associating with the wrong crowd, but Jesus knew that all communities were a mixture of the weeds and wheat, the good and bad, the crooked and the cracked, and it wasn't always easy to tell the difference.

The farmer in the parable thought he had an impossible task, but he did what most of us don't in this situation. He calmed down and was able to see things from a better perspective. Certainly, he could see that his precious field had both weeds and wheat and he recognised that he would have to work hard on the wheat, coaxing it and encouraging it so that it would outgrow the weeds. Like all good farmers, he worked hard on himself, not to give in to despair. He did not give up on his fled simply because it was a mixture of light and darkness. 

On harvest day the farmer separated the wheat and the weeds, and he reaped a fine harvest. Even though it fell short of the hundred per cent he had hoped for. It was a satisfying harvest because there is always more.

Firstly, we have to learn to be patient and lenient, mostly towards ourselves. We must be hospitable to all that we are. We must acknowledge the dark side of ourselves, with not conceding victory to it. We must struggle on in spite of the weeds, confident that goodwill finally triumph. It is through struggle that we are able to grow, provided we don't throw in the towel.

While we do have some responsibility to help the good plants flourish it is not our job as a church to set up inquisitions and purge the field for our own approved supports. The Church is not God after all. The final judgments are not ours to pronounce, but ours to prepare for, always with the hope that there will be changes before then. It is a hope that should never be denied, least of all by the followers of Jesus.
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References:
homily:  fr peter Dillon

prologue: Fr Paul W. Kelly. Quoting Mary Coloe. LiturgyHelp.com;  and MONASTERY OF CHRIST IN THE DESERT. ABBOT'S HOMILY.

Shutterstock licensed stock photo ID: 1325193074. Field bindweed twines around wheat grain stalks & spikes in a field. Close-up of convolvulus, having pink flower buds & green leaves, trails around a golden wheat stalk. Weed growing in a wheat field. By Ellita


Sixteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time. Year A (Sunday, July 19, 2020) (EPISODE: 241 )
Grace to you and peace from God our Father and the Lord Jesus Christ. (or/ The Lord be with You)
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{{hello everyone}}

Brothers and sisters, as we prepare ourselves to celebrate the Lord,s supper, let us recall our sins and acknowledge them in silence.
Lord Jesus, you came to reconcile us to the Father and to one another: Lord, have mercy//You heal the wounds of our sin and division: Christ, have mercy// You intercede for us with the Father: Lord, have mercy//
May almighty God have mercy on us, forgive us our sins, and bring us to everlasting life. Amen.
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Memorial Acclamation
3. Save us, Saviour of the world, for by your Cross and Resurrection you have set us free.
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PREFACE:
own preface
Various Needs and Occasions. II
Communion side. pwk: RH
(OPENING THEME VARIATION:
 4)
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{{thanks everyone. And may God sustain you with his grace and love.}}

Go in peace. 

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Archive of homilies and reflections: http://homilycatholic.blogspot.com.au
To contact Fr. Paul, please email:
paulwkelly68@gmail.com

To listen to my weekly homily audio podcast, please click this link here.
NB - It is often a week or so Ahead:
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Further information relating to the audio productions linked to this Blog:
"Faith, Hope and Love - Christian worship and reflection" - Led by Rev Paul Kelly

Prayers and chants — Roman Missal, 3rd edition, © 2010, The International Commission on English in the liturgy. (ICEL)

Scriptures - New Revised Standard Version: © 1989, and 2009 by the NCC-USA. (National Council of Churches of Christ - USA)

"The Psalms" ©1963, 2009, The Grail - Collins publishers. 

Prayers of the Faithful - " Together we pray," by Robert Borg'. E.J. Dwyer, Publishers, (1993) . (Sydney Australia).

Sung "Mass In Honour of St. Ralph Sherwin" - By Jeffrey M. Ostrowski. The ….Gloria, Copyright © 2011 ccwatershed.org.

- "Faith, Hope and Love" theme hymn - in memory of William John Kelly - Inspired by 1 Corinthians 13:1-13. Music by Paul W. Kelly. Arranged and sung, with additional lyrics by Stefan Kelk. 2019.

"Quiet Time."  Instrumental Reflection music. Written by Paul W Kelly. This arrangement Stefan Kelk 2020.

- "Today I Arise" - For Tricia J Kelly. Original words and music by Paul W. Kelly. Inspired by St Patrick's Prayer. Arranged and sung, with additional lyrics by Stefan Kelk. 2019. 

May God bless and keep you.
 
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